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the united states as the move towards a democracy. the obama administration has said it is considering using sanctions against myanmar, also known as burma. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> well, welcome to all of you. this is my first official of bent as the new president. what a thrill, frankly, to be here with you. her first visit to the united states in 20 years. no. a 40 years. and she chose to come to the institute for her first public address. we have wonderful partners in the society. and the blue moon a society. we have a great relationship with the state department of secretary clinton today. a number of her colleagues are here. kurt campbell. in addition, i would like to particularly recognize a couple of our board members. without her, i do not think this event would have occurred. i would like to thank her for coming. i like to turn things over. [applause] >> i join with jim. i want to tell you that this is an extremely large and important a pleasure that we have in welcoming all of you here today. it is an event in honor of remarkable individual. we welcome you and your dele
, the global public square. welcome to all of you around the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have at important story for you today. start with the proet -- protests. we'll talk to paul wolfowitz and others. next up, michael lewis spent eight months in the white house with unprecedented access to president obama. we'll talk about who obama is and how he makes decisions. also, why is israel trying to get the united states to commit to waging war when israel itself isn't willing to do so. and finally we'll take a look at these pictures. do you think they were taken by nasa or the european space agency? no, a teenager with a second-hand camera. >>> but first here's my take. the images of the american embassy burning in benghazi might have conjured up memories of tehran in 1979, but the analogy is false. in libya, the government is not fomenting anti-americanism. it is fighting it, openly declaring america an ally and friend. libya is pro-american by two to one. the violence there appears to have been the work of small extremist elements that lack much popular support.
are having to adjust and they believe the united states is weak and they are taking appropriate action. bill: also over the weekend congressman mike rogers, chairman of the house intelligence committee and former fbi agent echoed that sentiment. >> the countries of middle east believe there is a disengagement policy by the united states and that lack of leadership there or at least clarity on what our position is causing problems. i, if we all decide to rally around the video as the problem we're going to make a serious mistake and we're going to make i think diplomatic mistakes as we move forward if we think that is the only reason people are showing up at our embassy to conduct acts violence. bill: the romney campaign says the obama administration is failing to throughout that part of the world. heather: there is more trouble brewing between israel and iran as a nightmare scenario could be coming close to reality. prime minister benjamin netanyahu says the iran will be the on the brink of nuclear capabilities in just six months. he use ad metaphor to describe the new emergency and claims t
, the united states is falling behind those countries. he said that the united states needs to be doing better than europe. that's one of his big go-to lines. europe is not working for europe. it isn't going to work here in the united states. so these two campaigns are going to be going at it over the economy. we heard president obama throw out a very attack line talking about the mother jones video that came out. he said in front of that crowd, he said when i look out at this crowd i don't see a lot of victims, referring to what mitt romney said in that hidden camera video. they're talking about defense stuff. but the economy looming o everything else. >> thank you, jim. appreciate it as always. president obama and mitt romney face to face. first presidential debate wednesday night. watch it live, 7:00 eastern or cnn.com. >>> also another huge story that has everybody talking. no kidding. the nfl and its refs. right now nfl commissioner roger goodell is taking questions at a presser in new york. let's see what he's got to say. >> -- and on their side why, and if there was a problem with full-
steer america towards a fiscal cliff. we have voted 65 days this year in the united states senate. there are a number of things. you raise the one about the payroll tax cut, we haven't passed an appropriations bill this year. why is that? harry reid laid it out earlier in "the national journal." forget passing bills, the democrats want to pass the blame game. i see this. we haven't figured out if they are going to pay doctors next year. 30% cut. the president says he has extended the life of medicare, only if he lowers what they pay doctors who take care of doctors 30% and freezes that for the next 10 years. for somebody on medicare, they will have a difficult time finding a doctor to take care of them. host: it appears something fleeds to be done. your payroll tax conferee last year agreed to extend the payroll tax cut holiday for another year. are you in favor of doing so again? guest: i voted against the conference committee report. i don't think it's going to be extended this year. we are looking at tax rates going up. death tax coming back in a much more onerous way. there is
, tribal, territorial and international partners and members of this committee. while the united states has made significant progress since the 9/11 attacks, we know threats from terror persist and continually evolve. we faced direct threats from al qaeda. we face growing threats of other foreign-based terrorist groups, which are inspired by al qaeda ideology, such as hq ap and al-shabaab. we must address threats that are homegrown as well as those that originate abroad. is threats are not limited to any one individual, group or ideology and as we have seen taxes employed by terrorists can be as simple as a homemade bomb or as sophisticated as the biologic threat or coordinated cyberattack. while we deal with a number of threats and threat actors at any given time, three areas merit special sustained attention. the first is aviation. christmas day 2000 plot, the october 2010th air cargo thread in the aqa peapod earlier this year would have targeted a u.s. bound airliner with explosives made clear that commercial aviation remains a target. terrace, especially aqap continue to seek ways to ci
to dissociate the united states from that hateful video that insulted the prophet of islam. he said that there are important rights of free speech under the first amendment and we have to protect those rights, and if the government a press free-speech, it makes the world a less free place. he also had a message for iran, that while we want to negotiate through diplomacy if possible, time is not unlimited. that was a warning to the iranian government, which has been obstreperous and very difficult to deal with. i think it was a very important speech the president gave in new york. host: how about mitt romney? can you assess from what you have heard and hear him write these past few months? is there a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encapsulate it? guest: i don't know if there is a romney doctrine yet. governor romney is a very smart, successful person. my guess is that it is not the issue he wants to emphasize in the campaign. once the campaign to be about the economy and the unemployment rate. it is a difficult position for a republican to be running against a democ
. >> warner: the president said the united states would work with the libyan government to track down the perpetrators. >> today, we mourn four more americans who represent the very best of the united states of america. we will not waver in our commitment to see that justice is done for this terrible act. and make no mistake, justice will be done. >> warner: for now, the pentagon ordered special units of marines to libya called "fast" teams, like this detachment shown training, to reinforce security at diplomatic sites in libya. and from tripoli, the president of libya's national assembly echoed the words of his american counterparts. >> ( translated ): we apologize to the united states of america and to the american people and to the whole world for what happened, and at the same time we expect the rest of the world to help us face these cowardly criminal acts. we refuse to use our country's land as a scene of cowardly reprisals. >> warner: those reprisals came apparently in response to internet clips of a film titled "the innocence of muslims" that crudely defamed the prophet muhamm
judiciary led the way to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and oral brennan to the supreme court, but the host of liberal republicans such as the president appointed himself like albert title of georgia and john of louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment i think that eisenhower made at that time is that of john marshall hall of the great conservative justice and just after the landmark decision in brown v board of education. shortly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died leaving the vacancy on the court, and at that point roosevelt turned to the grandson of the great marshall harlem who would be the only dissenter in percy versus ferguson and 1896, the case legalized segregation by appointing the great dissenter eisenhower was making a statement he could not have adored. he said eisenhower was going to enforce it. when the segregation attempted to swap the integration in little rock eisenhower sent
they're policies are, look at the map. look at the map of the united states in terms of seas, prom mentors, harbors these, coast of the united states, the 13 colonies, was jam packed with great natural harbors. the whole coast of africa, thousands of miles, relatively few good harbors which hindered africa's development, but the east coast was packed with them, and the united states, the continental core of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the zone that was settled and waterways flowing in a convenient east-west fashion than the rest of the world's waterways combined. so i'm saying that americans -- we're important not only because of their ideas and their democracy but because of where we happen to live as well, and so that's why these things, like mountains matter. the himalayas matter. they have allowed india and china to develop into who completely disstink great world civilizations without having much to do with each other, through long periods of history. >> so let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly suitable geographical place with all th
. the united states drew a clear, red line. iran backed off. different lines can be drawn in the i iranian nuclear program. but to be credible, a line must be drawn first and foremost in one vital part of their program -- on their efforts to enrich uranium. let me explain why. any bomb consists of an explosive material and a mechanism to ignite it. the simplest example is fuse.der in and a you light the fuse and set off the gunpowder. the gunpowder is enriched uranium in regards to iran's nuclear program. the fuse is a detonator. for iran, amassing enough uranium is far more difficult than producing a nuclear fuse. for a country like iran, it takes many, many years to enrich uranium for a bomb. that requires thousands of center fuses spinning in tandem in big industrial plants. those are green plants are visible. they are still vulnerable. in contrast, iran could produce a record detonator, the fuse, in a lot less time. maybe under a year. maybe only a few months. the detonator can be made in a small workshop the size of the classroom. it might be difficult to find and target that workshop
action to put our fiscal health in order and obviously that is a bigger challenge in the united states were adding a trillion dollars in debt year after year -- though how does it unplayed? >> that could serve as a source of entertainment to the canadian community. >> how do you think the u.s. does play out? >> i think that is a big risk and the frustrating thing in the u.s. is that the core is so strong and so good. you know we have illegal immigration by the way the average -- no growth over five years which includes a downturn but basically it's a big economy in 2% on a big economy as a big number and i think it goes. but it's very -- these problems are self-inflicted to a great extent and it makes it all the more frustrating and it must be frustrating to watch last summer with the debt ceiling and save why don't you compromise and why don't you get this done? i would say it's sometimes more frustrating to watch something that you can undo. it's like seeing it spiraling and you wish you could stop it and is within everybody's power to stop it. i think it's a political system to some
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and william brennan to supreme court. it was a host of liberal republicans that roosevelt appointed himself. men like elbert tuttle of georgia and john wants in a louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment, i think, that eisenhower made at the time, was that of john marshall harlan, great conservative justice, just after the court's landmark decision in brown versus board of education. certainly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died, leaving a vacancy on the court. at that point, roosevelt turned to harlem, who is the grandson of the great john marshall harlan, who had been the only dissenter in 1896, a place that utilized segregation, by pointing harlem, the main gate of the great dissenter, eisenhower was making a statement of the south could not ignore. desegregation was the law of the land and eisenhower was going to enforce it. when a mob attempted to block it,
things that is not a premarket industry in the united states because regardless of whether we have the information as to the optimus and effectiveness of a hospital or a physician problem -- or a physician, our health care provider networks that we are allowed to use are dictated by the insurance companies. a lot of the discussion about health care in the united states, people fail to discuss the role of the insurance companies and in network and out of network providers. i would like for you to comment on a world of our employers and large insurance companies play in directing where we get care. oftentimes, we are not allowed to get hair -- get care at, say, a university hospital or a teaching hospital regardless of our condition since solely because the out of pocket expenses will be way too high for a person to report getting the best care, even though it exists. guest: in my book and "and accountable," i share the reasons why it patient often decides to come to, particular hospital. their mother was treated there, the party was easy. if people are choosing a hospital based on t
to fund programs all over the united states where we wouldn't only improve -- we wouldn't only build things that we need, but improve them. the american society of civil engineers has addressed this issue, mr. speaker. what they have said, 2.3 trillion of infrastructure maintenance needs to be done. i come from the city of minneapolis and in my city, we had a bridge fall into the mississippi river. maintenance in this country is critical. we have bridges that are old and deteriorating all over this country. we have bridges that are in need of repair, roads as well, and we also have other projects that need to be taken care of, in terms of our grid and wastewater treatment, in terms of all types of important infrastructure. but we have not invested. we are relying on things that our grandparents gave us. we are relying on eisenhower-era infrastructure, because we haven't in our age focused on the needs of the american people to have infrastructure bill. just to talk a little bit more about the american jobs act, it would also extend cutting payroll taxes in half for 98% of businesses.
for half of our fellow american americans is the other side's choice for president of the united states. he wants to lead our country. in 2008, then candidate obama spurred similar controversy when he was caught on tape at a fund-raiser making these comments about conservative voters. >> it's not surprising then that they get bitter. they cling to their guns or religion or antipathy towards people who aren't like them. >> now, of course, all of this is coming as romney is trying to talk about jobs. that's the point he was making here in los angeles. chamber of commerce, when he spoke to that group yesterday. this is a distraction now for him. he heads off to utah and texas. he has fund-raisers there. >> how troubled are they by this? >> they think this is unfortunate. not so much his underlying point, which doesn't really contradict his campaign message, but the way he said it. there's no plans now to really back off this, issue an apology. because it does kind of square with a lot of romney's message, which is that the president has a campaign that wants more government, big government. an
is suspending joint missions between the united states soldier and afghan soldiers with a growing number of insider attacks. what does this mean for the end of the war? or the war now? we have details from the pentagon. and the attack on diplomatic missions across the middle east putting foreign policy on the campaign trail controversial. the potential impact on the undecided voters coming up. a study suggests letting your kid take the occasional sip of alcohol may really not be the best way to stop your child from becoming a heavy drinker later on. that is all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." but, first, from fox at 3:00 in new york city, the race if the white house. the republican presidential nominee, mitt romney, is responding today to a video shot in may during a private fundraiser. an attendee secretly recorded and it gave it to the liberal website "mother jones." in the video, he touches on everything from foreign policy to the economy. at one point he calls president obama supporters "people who are dependent upon the government who believe they
's a crude film. they know it has nothing to do with the united states government. it is an excuse. one intelligence person told me, if you scratch the surface, and if you gave every street vendor from street vendor to prime minister in that region a chance to throw a rock at the u.s. embassy, they would. so this is their excuse. >> look at what's happening in afghanistan 11 years later. >> and look what's happening in afghanistan. and is it just me? willie, is it just me, or is it -- we have the grave concern about the tragedy that happened to the ambassador and our people that have served so proudly for, you know, for the state department who were killed. and yet this weekend, more u.s. troops in afghanistan gunned down by our supposed allies. this happens every day. this happens every day. and yes, our u.s. ambassador being killed is just absolutely horrific. but every single day, young american men and women are gunned down in afghanistan. >> 51 of them this year on insider attacks. 51 nato troops including many americans this year. >> nobody's talking about it. >> to your point exa
. and i should say this too. the israeli prime minister, before embarking to the united states, made remarks briefly yesterday on the holiest day, right before the holiest day in the jewish calendar, yom kippur. he said this speaking about mahmoud ahmadinejad speaking at the united nations on that very same day. and i quote. on this day when we pray to be inscribed to the book of life a platform was given to a dictatorial regime who tries at every step to sentence us to death. it is position of the israeli prime minister if not stopped iran will developed enriched-uranium that could be used to make a bomb as early as spring of 2013. we expect him to elaborate on that in just the next few moments. megyn. megyn: david lee miller, thank you so. there was, as we've always heard from iran some bellicose language from its leader in the united nations. israel will have the chance to respond after mr. netanyahu speaks, we will be joined live right here for reaction and perspective by general jack keane and ambassador john bolton. don't miss it. busy afternoon. >> the cost of food is up. the
of the united states. what exactly do you mean? >> well, jim, first of all, i would like to thank the sponsors of this debate and the people of boston for hosting the debate. i would like to thank governor bush for participating, and i would like to say i'm happy to be here with tipper and our family. i have actually not questioned governor bush's experience. i have questioned his proposals. and here is why. i think this is a very important moment for our country. we have achieved extraordinary prosperity. and in this election, america has to make an important choice. will we use our prosperity to enrich not just the few, but all of our families? i believe we have to make the right and responsible choices. if i'm entrusted with the presidency, here are the choices that i will make. i will balance the budget every year. i will pay down the national debt. i will put medicare and social security in a lockbox and protect them. and i will cut taxes for middle- class families. i believe it's important to resist the temptation to squander our surplus. if we make the right choices, we can have a prosp
produce all sorts of nuclear missiles getting ahead of the united states in defense in a way that was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. one of the reasons he won election in 1960. he got into office with access to intelligence and realized soviets are way behind, extremely behind the united states. there is a missile gap in favor of the united states so the problem was kennedy and campaign said we need to increase defense in order to make of this problem and he was committed to that. in 1961 the largest defense buildup in human history and the results to a great extent, one of the ways he dealt with that, and a large portion of humanity to death. >> when did crucial of -- >> guest: he was high on solid leadership but when we went to dinner at stalin's, never knew when the car came back whether it would take us home or to the gulag and it did take some people to the gulag but not crucial of. stalin died in 1953. there were two leaders who were essentially joint leadership. khrushchev and malenkov. by 54-55-56, crucial of was the supreme l
. earlier this year iran threatened to close the strait of hormuz. the united states drew a clear red line, and iran backed off. now, red lines could be drawn in different parts of iran's nuclear weapons program. to be credible a red line must be drawn first and foremost in one vital part of their program. on iran's efforts to enrich uranium. now, let me explain why. basically any bomb consists of explosive material and a mechanism to ignite it. the simplest example is gunpowder and a fuse. that is you light the fuse, and you set off the gunpowder. in the case of iran's plans to build a nuclear weapon, the gunpowder is enriched uranium. the fuse is a nuclear detonator. for iran amassing enough enriched uranium is far more difficult than producing the nuclear fuse. for a country like iran, it takes many, many years to enrich uranium for a bomb. that requires thousands of centrifuges spinning in tandem in big, very big industrial plants. those iranian plants are visible, and they're still vulnerable. in contrast, iran could produce the nuclear detonator, the fuse, in a lot less time. maybe u
be accurately described as young. >> thank you so much. there is no organization in the united states that is better at serving as a forum for the principal legal issues of the day. i have been asked to comment as well on the voting rights and same-sex marriage issues. she has done such a good job in describing these cases. the two points i would make about same-sex and voting rights act cases is why would the justices get involved because these cases are not on the docket. the court family takes only one out of 100 cases. but doma has been invalidated by a federal court of appeals. if we're going to strike down a federal statute, that is our job, the supreme court's job. the voting rights act cases, several of them come on appeal. generally, you have to ask the supreme court to grant review in your case. but there are tiny slivers of cases in the united states code that allow them to go to the supreme court could but the voting rights cases they almost have to take. they suggested very serious concerns about the constitutionality of section 5. they have a lot of interest in this issu
of nuclear missiles, getting way ahead of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the wes
of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the west. but khrushchev actually realized th
the threat of terrorism, globally and here in the united states. the third, i think about my children a lot. what their future is like. >> a small business owner says the federal regulations made it difficult to add employees. >> if we hire the additional people we have to hire an outside firm to main tain and make sure we stay in regulation or we have to hire individuals a bring them on board to do that. >> an undecided voter says she is leaning toward one candidate for the economy and the other on social issues. >> i struggle whether i should decide on the pocketbook or the social issues. the two parties are very, very different. >> experts predict the obama and the romney campaigns will continue a significant push in virginia. to win over the undecided. >> virginia is one of the closest of the tossup states. it's nearly tied if you ample out the polls. as a consequence, the two or three or 4% hard undecided could easily make the difference. a number of undecided voters are sick of the campaign ads and tired of the robo calls asking for their votes. but with 13 electoral votes at issue he
political debates in the united states. >> it sure has. we begin with the race for the white house as it's now a sprint. only 59 days are left until the election. president obama was hoping for a post convention bounce. but the disappointing unemployment numbers may get in the way of that. both president obama and mitt romney are back on the campaign trail today and up employment remains at the top of the agenda. nancy cordes is traveling with the president in seminole, florida. nancy, good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you, anthony. the president will be campaigning all weekend long in vote rich central florida while governor romney is in virginia. both candidates are talking about that new jobs report. as you might imagine, the two men see it very differently. the president hit the campaign trail with vice president biden and their wives for the first time this campaign season. he told voters in iowa city that the drop in the unemployment rate from 8.3% to 8.1 was a good sign. >> we can do better. we need to create jobs even faster. we need to fill the hole left by this recessi
in 2014. so that means that afghanistan may become once again a base for terrorism, against the united states, and this whole effort has been a disaster. >> and it undermines the trust that they hope to build between the americans and the afghanis. but i think it is a little bit of an overreach to say this is the difference between leaving a relative success and a huge disaster. i think whenever we leave, whether it is in 2014, which is when it will be, or 10 years into the future, afternoon is still going to be an unsettled place. but i don't think we can fix that forever. >> what percentage of nato forces, including americans, have been killed by reason of these insider attacks? >> a small percentage. >> 15%. >> oh, 15% of -- from insider attacks? >> it shows -- >> it is a vial situation. >> it shows exactly why, what george w. bush tries to undertake there in -- after driving out the taliban, and the al qaeda supporters, just that regime, then trying to build it as a nation, that that was folly, and president obama has tried to do that, too and we're playing make-believe, oh, 2014,
threats from the united states. >>> back here at home, a new mosque will be built in santa clara county. county approval has been given to build the cordova center. the approval process has been controversial. look at this. although many support it, others say the plan to build a cemetery at that site could contaminate ground water. county supervisors say the center has passed every requirement. >>> beginning march 1st, rvs will be banned from parking overnight in parts of san francisco. yesterday, the board of supervisors passed the ban on the vehicles, saying it was to help people get out of rvs and into temporary housing. but homeless advocates say this could force more people onto the streets. a complete list approved will be banned by the tsa and will likely include parts of the sunset and bayview district. >>> tesla's score says he's working on a -- tesla's ceo says he's working on a rail, a people-moving tube that he calls a hyperloop. he says it would cost $6 billion and tickets bo -- tickets would be cheaper than airfare. >>> time now, 7:05. sal is gonna take us to a ride at th
, against the united states, and this whole effort has been a disaster. >> and it undermines the trust that they hope to build between the americans and the afghanis. but i think it is a little bit of an overreach to say this is the difference between leaving a relative success and a huge disaster. i think whenever we leave, whether it is in 2014, which is when it will be, or 10 years into the future, afternoon is still going to be an unsettled place. but i don't think we can fix that forever. >> what percentage of nato forces, including americans, have been killed by reason of these insider attacks? >> a small percentage. >> 15%. >> oh, 15% of -- from insider attacks? >> it shows -- >> it is a vial situation. >> it shows exactly why, what george w. bush tries to undertake there in -- after driving out the taliban, and the al qaeda supporters, just that regime, then trying to build it as a nation, that that was folly, and president obama has tried to do that, too and we're playing make-believe, oh, 2014, maybe we won't be able to leave. we will leave. it will be more than unsettled. it
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